Past exhibition

Arrêt sur collections - Made in Japan

During the summer of 2014, we will once again offer you the opportunity to discover some of the 12.000 art works from our collections.

Made in Japan

Hundreds of art works by 33 Japanese artists will offer an overview of prints and graphics in the land of the rising sun, from the second half of the twentieth century onwards. Art works by Shuzaku ARAKAWA, Kengiro AZUMA, Susumu ENDO, Kosuke KIMURA, Aki KURODA, Takesada MATSUTANI, Tetsuya NODA, Hiroko OKAMOTO...


 

Both in traditional and contemporary art, Japan has always been developing a powerful graphic and visual culture. Since 1945, many traumas worsened by an oppressive urbanization, have been expressed in Japanese art. The original influence of the avant-garde movement Gutai, developed from 1956 onwards, has marked the international art scene forever.

Both in traditional and contemporary art, Japan has always been developing a powerful graphic and visual culture. Since 1945, many traumas worsened by an oppressive urbanization, have been expressed in Japanese art. The original influence of the avant-garde movement Gutai, developed from 1956 onwards, has marked the international art scene forever.

In the field of prints, many international exchanges contributed to this development by means of biennial exhibitions. Some etchers were mainly working in France, the United States and Italy, such as Shuzaku ARAKAWA (1936-2010), Kengiro AZUMA (1926), Koji FURUDOÏ (1947), Shoishi IDA (1941-2006), Aki KURODA (1944) and Takesada MATSUTANI (1937). Others were living and teaching in Japan: Ryuta ENDO (1960), Susumu ENDO (1933), Kosuke KIMURA (1936), Kunito NAGAOKA (1940), Takashi TANAKA (1948) and Yoshio YOSHIMURA (1950). All of them applied various etching techniques and largely relied on the new technologies. The traditional woodcut, ukiyo- e, which was very popular in Paris from the end of the nineteenth century onwards, implied a life philosophy and strongly influenced European painters, especially the impressionists. Apparently, the eye for detail, combined with the understanding of nature, keeps determining the art works of some contemporary Japanese etchers such as Mayumi MORINO (1941), Hiroko OKAMOTO (1957-2007), Tadayoshi NAKABAYASHI (1937) or Tetsuya NODA (1940), according to the diary style.

Graphic design will be represented by 18 creations from 1989 until today. As from 1925, the Japanese art poster dissociated itself from traditional painting in order to come up, after the Second World War, with a new generation of graphic designers in the style of Masaru Katsumi, the developer of graphic design in Japan. Among these pioneers, we can find the following artists: Masuteru AOBA (1939-2011), Shigeo FUKUDA (1932-2009), Takenobu IGARASHI (1944), Yusaku KAMEKURA (1915-1997), Mitsuo KATSUI (1931), Shin MATSUNAGA (1940), Kazumasa NAGAI (1929), Makoto SAITO (1952), Koichi SATO (1944), U.G. SATO (1935), Yoshitake SUGIMOTO (1944), Ikko TANAKA (1930-2002) and Tadanori YOKOO (1936). The young Japanese graphic scene will be impersonated in the exhibition by four participants to the Tokyo Graphic Passport 2011 in Paris: Kazunari HATTORI (1964), Atsuki KIKUCHI (1974), Masayoshi KODAIRA (1970) and Hideki NAKAJIMA (1961).

In addition, two important donations will be highlighted: Mario AVATILISMONDE

107 works

in the collection